Thai Peppers: Heated Confusion, But Always Spicy!

| Last Updated: August 17, 2019 |

You are here: Home / Pepper Profiles / Thai Peppers: Heated Confusion, But Always Spicy!

Many varieties fall into the world of Thai peppers

Scoville heat units: 50,000 – 100,000
Jalapeño reference point: 6 to 40 times hotter
Origin: Thailand
Products and seeds: Thai pepper on Amazon

Let’s start with the confusion. There are dozens of varieties of chilies that fall under the category of Thai peppers. They all share common characteristics, colors, and general heat. And because of that, a little confusion is expected – and it’s totally ok! You’ll typically get what you’re looking for (some solid heat and flavor) out of any chili labeled as Thai peppers.

How hot are Thai peppers?

These chilies fall in the range of “pretty darn hot”, which in more scientific terms means around 50,000 to 100,000 Scoville heat units. That’s about 23 times the average heat of a jalapeño. But really they are at the bottom rung of what you’d call the hot peppers. They are typically about 3 times less spicy than a habanero, so if you’re venturing into the hot pepper level for the first time, a stop off at Thai peppers is good way to travel.

What else are Thai peppers called?

As mentioned, there are lots of varieties, and to add to the confusion even more, some varieties have multiple names. Probably the most well-known name is the bird’s eye chili, with variant names like Thai dragon peppers, African devil, Congo chilies, phrik khi nu (in Thailand), and cili padi (in Malaysia), and many other localized names based off of regions.

Perhaps the most fitting name of the bunch is Thai dragon peppers. These chilies have some fire, they are red when ripened (like dragon’s breath), and their shape (an inch or two in length, thin, and curved) even look like the claws of a dragon. Now that’s a cool name if there ever was one.

How are Thai peppers eaten?

These chilies make their way into many Thai and Asian dishes of course, including many spicy soups. You’ll find lots of recipes in Asian and Thai cookbooks that call for these spicy peppers.

There are also lots of products based around Thai chilies, from pepper flakes and hot sauces, to marinades and powders. These are very popular for their hot kick, and the fact that they can add heat in a pinch for Thai dishes if needed.

Where can you buy Thai peppers?

Many grocery stores will carry Thai chilies, if not in the fresh produce section, then at least canned in the international sections of the store. Or, via online retailers you can buy the seeds (if you’ve got the gardening bug), the plants, the raw peppers, and all sorts of hot sauces and other products. It is more than likely your best bet for variety if you live outside of an urban area.

This pepper is more than just a stop off on our way up to the habanero. Thai peppers are an essential ingredient to a whole slew of unique and tasty eastern dishes. If you love those types of meals and you’re looking to make them yourself, then you’ll become very familiar with these chilies. They’re a cooking staple.

Previous

Anaheim Pepper: A Versatile Mild Chili

Trinidad Moruga Scorpion: Super Hot Sting

Next

Leave a Reply

Please Login to comment
avatar
 
smilegrinwinkmrgreenneutraltwistedarrowshockunamusedcooleviloopsrazzrollcryeeklolmadsadexclamationquestionideahmmbegwhewchucklesillyenvyshutmouth
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
Other File Types
 
 
 
  Subscribe  
Notify of
shares