SAUS “Do Everything” Sauce Review

The makers of SAUS call it a “do everything” sauce and amplify that with four words: dip, drip, blend, and grill. Yeah, that seems about right. SAUS cooking sauce is a sweet and tangy delight: big flavor and a high level of usability. But how well is the heat balanced and does this sauce stand out from the pack of “daily driver” cooking or hot sauces? Let’s grab a bottle and see what it’s all about.

SUMMARY
SAUS “Do Everything” Sauce
4.7
$14.95

SAUS is truly a “do everything sauce”, working just as well as a dipper as it does a blending or grilling sauce — as long as peaches are your thing. Its peach-forward sweet flavor is bold, and the habaneros add to the sweetness while providing a low-medium kick. The bottle design is one-of-a-kind. 

Heat Level: Low-Medium
Pros:
  • Exceptional peach-forward flavor
  • Very versatile: drip, dip, blend, grill
  • Unique, collectible bottle design
Cons:
  • Sodium could add up depending on use case
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10/17/2021 01:14 am GMT

Flavor

You’ve got to love when a fruity spicy sauce kicks things off immediately in the ingredients list with the fruit in question. And that’s just what SAUS does. The ingredients: peaches, distilled white vinegar, organic cane sugar, molasses, water, habanero peppers, sea salt, ground mustard, spices, and paprika.

To call this a peach-forward sauce would be an understatement. Seriously, It’s an entirely new experience for me, and I fell fast for the flavor of this sauce. You get that sweet tang from the peaches immediately, followed fast by the sweet earthiness of the molasses. Cane sugar is here, too, to balance out the fruity sweetness some, but really the show belongs to those peaches (and what a show it is!)

The vinegar tang in SAUS is slight — more complementing the natural fruity tang than starring in this sauce. The same is true for the ground mustard. It’s additive to the tang without overwhelming the flavor.

SAUS on a spoon
SAUS on a spoon

The habanero peppers fall right inline with the fruitiness, while adding just enough heat to keep this in the “everyday driver” range for sauces.

Overall, this is one delicious sauce. Fruity, fresh, and bold. And if you’re a fan of peaches, you’ll find yourself in true love with SAUS.

On the sodium: SAUS has 60 mg per teaspoon (3% of your daily allowance.) That’s not too bad, but it depends on how you use it. If you “drip” it, you likely won’t use much past a teaspoon. But if you “dip”, “blend”, or “grill” with it, multiple teaspoons are likely in play. You could easily use four or five teaspoons without much thought. The sodium can add up.

Heat Balance

Habanero peppers are the heat source here. They have a delicious natural fruitiness that pairs incredible well with peaches.

Fresh habaneros can be pretty hot, ranging from 100,000 to 350,000 Scoville heat units. Compare that to a jalapeño (2,500 to 8,000 SHU) and you can see the potential for pain.

Here, though, SAUS keeps things subdued. In fact, habanero peppers are pretty far down that ingredient list, meaning they are well diluted in the SAUS. The result? SAUS kicks somewhere from the upper end of mild to the lower end of medium. This is a sauce that most can enjoy without issue. And that fits — it’s marketed more as a cooking sauce than as a hot sauce. The fact that it has this much heat, I’ll take as a win.

The spiciness hits you on the tip of your tongue soon after the immediate peach flavor. It carries slightly to the back of your throat, but there’s not a serious burn here. Just a warm zap of heat. It lingers some, but not in an uncomfortable way. Think of it this way: the habaneros here in SAUS highlight more the sweet than the heat. And, again, that’s not a bad thing for a “do everything sauce.”

Usability

Speaking of “do everything”. Well, it’s pretty close. SAUS works with a ton of ingredients and meals. Eggs, steak, chicken (a great chicken fingers dipper!), fish (and fish tacos), ramen, toast, vegetables…the list goes on. That is, as long as you’re all-in on peach. It provides everything a delicious sweet tang with that touch of heat — making it very usable and extremely versatile.

Try it in “blend” mode by mixing it with some sour cream. It makes one super-tasty fish taco sauce. And don’t overlook it as a grilling marinade. The peach flavor works incredibly well with pork chops.

The spout of the SAUS bottle has a large opening — like the size of a half-dollar coin. That’s big, making it a little tough to handle the “drip” component of SAUS’s label. It’s built to pour and pour a lot.

But the SAUS sauce is pretty thick, so you do have some control here still. Plus, you can see all the fresh ingredients peaking through the smoothness. Yum.

Collectibility

Let’s go back to the bottle. SAUS’s bottle is quite unique. It’s squat and rounded. The cap itself is hand-dipped in what looks like wax — but it’s really an “eco-friendly wax alternative.” This sauce looks gift-ready without even putting it in a box.

And that’s, not-surprisingly, on purpose. The crafter of SAUS is a graphic designer by trade who loves giving stylish foodie gifts for the holidays. SAUS’s about page goes into it in detail.

That graphic design passion shines on the label as well. The “SAUS” font is very cool — sort of a German Oktoberfest feel. And the details about the sauce are well-balanced across it. The color scheme — a simple black and white — gives SAUS a classic, timeless feel as well. Overall, this is one of the better bottle designs out there — it really stands out from the pack.

The Score

SAUS is truly a “do everything sauce”, working just as well as a dipper as it does a blending or grilling sauce — as long as peaches are your thing. Its peach-forward sweet flavor is bold, and the habaneros add to the sweetness while providing a low-medium kick. The bottle design is one-of-a-kind.

FINAL SCORE4.7
Overall Flavor5
Heat Balance4
Usability4.5
Collectibility5
X-Factor5
Based on a scale from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest)

UPDATE NOTICE: This post was updated on October 11, 2021 to include new content. It was originally published on September 18, 2021.
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